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BEST OF DON WINSLOW OF THE NAVY

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BEST OF DON WINSLOW OF THE NAVY

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$29.95
Highly Recommended. By Frank V. Martinek. Edited by Craig Yoƫ. A collection of the best stories from the classic Fawcett Comics run of Don Winslow of the Navy, beginning with the first issue in 1943. A long, well illustrated introduction details his appearances first as a newspaper comic strip (1934-55), then in films beginning in 1942, books, pulps and other media. Here you'll find Winslow fighting the Axis powers as well as villains like The Snake and the smoldering hot, but deadly lady pirate, Singapore Sal. Winslow was a spy-chasing lieutenant commander in Naval intelligence.

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A collection of the best stories from the classic Fawcett Comics run of Don Winslow of the Navy, beginning with the first issue in 1943. A long, well illustrated introduction details his appearances first as a newspaper comic strip (1934-55), then in films beginning in 1942, books, pulps and other media. Here you'll find Winslow fighting the Axis powers as well as villains like The Snake and the smoldering hot, but deadly lady pirate, Singapore Sal. Winslow was a spy-chasing lieutenant commander in Naval intelligence.

The comic strip led to a radio show that began in 1937. The character served to foster recruitment, entertain Navy personnel and the general public up to and throughout World War II and beyond and was popular into the 1950s.

The comic strip debuted on March 5, 1934. A Sunday page was added in 1935. Creator Lieutenant Commander Frank V. Martinek, USNR, who served in Navy intelligence himself, supervised the daily feature’s "general tone and direction", sending the typewritten continuity to Naval Lieutenant Leon Beroth, who served as as art director and Carl Hammond to handle layouts and research. From 1934 to 1952, Beroth was the leading artist on the feature. Ken Ernst (later famous for Mary Worth), assisted or ghosted the art between 1940 and 1942.

With Don Winslow leaving his fiancée behind in December 1941 to go fight the Japanese, the World War II period saw the height of Don Winslow's popularity.

Although never an A-list title, this was a solid series. Of course, Fawcett was also home to the Captain Marvel family, Spy Smasher, Bulletman, etc.--and they knew how to write a good story, with writers like Otto Binder, William Woolfolk and C.C. Beck. These stories were more down to earth, with Winslow manning both ships and planes on adventures that pitted him against the Japanese, Nazis, and after the war, pirates, smugglers and the like.

"As a piece of comic book history, this is remarkable...blended somewhat realistic adventure fiction with outrageous pulp...lots of fistfights...a sexy female pirate...and a couple of really weird male villains that Dick Tracy would have loved." -ICv2

This may not make it into your typical bookstore and comic outlets. While it looks just like an archive by IDW or Dark Horse, it's actually funded and published by the U.S. Naval Institute! I personally collect Don Winslow comics as well as the Big Little Books. His two pulp appearances are extremely scarce. Craig's introduction is very well done, a good overview of all the history, from first idea to comic strip, including the uncredited writers and artists there, and with good illustrations of the pulps, serial posters, and even an unpublished cover that we show here in black and white. Handsome large size. -Bud

Additional Information

Additional Information

Item Code BEDWH
Publisher Dead Reckoning
Publish Date 2018
ISBN 9781682473238
Binding Hard Cover - No Dustjacket
Dimensions 9x11
# Pages 272pg
Color Full Color
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