$44.99

Collects #25-29, 1954-55. Highly Recommended. Art by Jim McLaughlin, Ken Rice, Lou Cameron et al. Pre-code horror by Bill Discount offers up Alex Toth-inspired art, and Rudy Palais puts in an appearance, albeit a reprint. In fact, #28 and #29 are all reprints from other Ace titles. Mike Sekowsky is also here. On the other hand, we are treated to three all-new great stories by Lou Cameron from his best period, right at the end of Ace’s tenure–“Mission of Lost Souls” is a wonderful example of his finest work, packed with bizarre creatures, and “One Door from Disaster” is done in tones, looking like Al Williamson and Frazetta! PS Artbooks, 2019.

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Pre-code horror by Bill Discount offers up Alex Toth-inspired art, and Rudy Palais puts in an appearance, albeit a reprint. In fact, #28 and #29 are all reprints from other Ace titles. Mike Sekowsky is also here. On the other hand, we are treated to three all-new great stories by Lou Cameron from his best period, right at the end of Ace’s tenure–“Mission of Lost Souls” is a wonderful example of his finest work, packed with bizarre creatures, and “One Door from Disaster” is done in tones, looking like Al Williamson and Frazetta!

Both stories are shown here in our scans. Also by Cameron is “Lair of the Silken Doom.” Silk merchant Stanley Raffel starts a business partnership with the mysterious and beautiful Lycia who provides him with the finest silk to be found. Little does Raffel realize that Lycia is a gigantic spider processing her victims’ bodies into silk threads. But he will find out. It’s another great Cameron story.

Additional artists: Sy Grudko, Ace Baker, Jerry Grandenetti, Louis Zansky, and Paul Parker.

“Doorway to Yesterday” is a Sekowsky-drawn time travel adventure of a newspaper reporter who goes back to ancient Rome. Artist Rudy Palais offers us yet a new take on “Curse of the Mummy,” and a tale of retribution, narrated by our “Fate” character who appears throughout these issues, with “The Haunted Three.”

“Valley of the Scaly Monsters” offers us reptile men and a leggy lady in a plunging, open front shirt that would never have passed the upcoming comics code.

“Mine Own Executioner” is credited tentatively to Jim McLaughlin, who is an unusually good artist entirely forgotten today. His fine line work stands out, much like the work of John Prentice. Here is London, 1751: “Sniveling lawyer” John Drummond strikes a deal with Baalzaar, Satan’s first lieutenant. Drummond enters into a career as the highest judge at Old Bailey, if he sends as many souls as possible to the gallows. Having become an evil man, he is Baalzaar’s biggest prize in the end.

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