Account   |   Cart

THE ADVENTURES OF BUCK O'RUE

More Views

THE ADVENTURES OF BUCK O'RUE

Availability: In stock

Regular Price: $29.95

Sale Price $14.95

Closeout Price! Dailies Jan 1951-July '52 & Sundays May 1951-Dec 52. Recommended. By Dick Huemer & Paul Murry. This is a spoof of the then-current craze for westerns and cowboy heroes. It is satisfyingly thick (300 pages!) with lots of detail about both creators and how the strip came to be. Here is the full story of a wonderful 1950s comic strip, very much a Disney animated feature cleverly disguised as a daily and Sunday comic strip, with these two creators' incredible talents evident from the first page.

For full description, see below.

OR
Full Description

Details

This is a spoof of the then-current craze for westerns and cowboy heroes. It is satisfyingly thick (300 pages!) with lots of detail about both creators and how the strip came to be. Here is the full story of a wonderful 1950s comic strip, very much a Disney animated feature cleverly disguised as a daily and Sunday comic strip, with these two creators' incredible talents evident from the first page.

Fred Patten offers this online review:

"...everything about this obscure, short-lived comic strip. It was created by writer Dick Huemer (1898-1979) and cartoonist Paul Murry (1911-1989), two longstanding Walt Disney studio employees who had just been temporarily laid off. They created the Buck O’Rue strip together as self-employment, then ironically were called back almost immediately by Disney and given so much work that they did not have time to continue their strip. Huemer’s later Walt Disney work, mostly on the TV programs, included writing the Disney True-Life Adventures newspaper strip from 1955 to his retirement in 1973, while Murry spent the rest of his career drawing Disney-character comic books including those Mickey Mouse stories... Buck O’Rue lasted from January 15, 1951 to December 7, 1952 when it was discontinued in mid-story."

"In addition to the complete run of the strip (except for six daily strips that could not be found), this book includes publicity press releases written about it from Los Angeles to Toronto, photographs of Huemer and Murry, biographies of them (including caricatures by other Disney cartoonists), samples of their other work including pre-Disney cartoons (Huemer had previously worked at the Fleischer Studios in New York) and their other Disney assignments, and an essay by the son of Buck O’Rue’s distributor, the tiny Lafave Newspaper Features.

For two humorists in 1950-‘51, the Western must have seemed the obvious subject to lampoon. During the 1940s and 1950, Westerns were one of popular entertainment’s favorite genres. There were the series movies with Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Hopalong Cassidy, and many others, and the non-series movies starring A-list actors, exemplified by such as Shane and High Noon. There were the radio dramas like The Lone Ranger. There were comic books; practically every movie cowboy hero had his own comic book, there were independent comic-book publishers’ series like Timely/Marvel’s Two-Gun Kid, funny animals like Mickey Mouse and Porky Pig had frequent Western adventures, and there were even funny animal cowboy heroes like ‘Red’ Rabbit. In newspaper comic strips, there were Hopalong Cassidy, the Lone Ranger, and the Cisco Kid again.

But these were all played straight. Even the Westerns starring funny animals were straight-faced adventures. Huemer and Murry set out to parody this. Buckingham O’Rue was the acme of a cowboy hero; handsome, respectful to wimmenfolk, and ready to accept any gunfight duel although he always shot to plug his adversary’s gunbarrel or to deflect his bullets, never to maim, much less kill. Although he had a steady girl friend, the lovely Dorable Duncan, readers soon suspected that he cared for his horse, Reddish, and his shiny six-shooter Silver Sal more than he did for her."

"The strip was set in the town of Mesa Trubil, “The Town Without a Country”; so wild and untameable that it had been expelled from the United States (technically, it seceded along with the rest of the South in 1861, and when the Civil War was over the U.S. wouldn’t let it back in). Mesa Trubil was ruled by Trigger Mortis and his gang (Skullface Skelly, Kit Schmit, Rockjaw Jones, No-Gun Nolan, Billy the Schnook, and Feather-Fingers Foley). For the two years of Buck O’Rue, the strip went back and forth between Buck defeating Trigger Mortis and his gang and becoming the new mayor of Mesa Trubil..."

Episodes:

Election in Mesa Trubil
The Floomies
Oaf Monday
The Schmatum Bomb
A Clash with Trigger Mortis
Betrayed by “Two-Faced” Tessie
Swede Kelly is Shot!
The Kidnapping of Dorable Duncan
A Trial of Wits

Paul Murray worked on major Disney films including Pinocchio, Fantasia, Dumbo and Song of the South, plus countless shorts and cartoons before becoming a regular drawing Mickey Mouse in Walt Disney's Comics and Stories. You will recognize his style instantly, if you are familiar with those classic Mickey adventures in the 1950s and 1960s era Comics & Stories. There's no mistaking it!

Huemer was the story director on Dumbo, Alice in Wonderland, Fantasia, went on to work on the Disneyland TV Series and created the strip Walt Disney's True Life Adventures, which was syndicated for decades.

Additional Information

Additional Information

Item Code BUCKO
Publisher Classic Comics Press
Publish Date 2012
ISBN 9780985049911
Binding Soft Cover
Dimensions 11x9
# Pages 302pg
Color b&w
Reviews

You may also be interested in the following item(s)